Our Curriculum

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Curriculum areas

How we assess progress

At The Pegasus Academy Trust we believe that assessment should be used to measure children’s progress and to inform future planning.  We also have to fulfil our statutory duties around assessment.  Assessment takes the form of summative and formative assessment at different points of the year and, at the end of the year, this information is shared with parents in an end of year report.

Children’s progress is tracked against descriptors or targets set out in line with the national curriculum expectations for different year groups. Teachers monitor whether or not children are ‘On track’ to complete all of the learning required at each stage of education.  This then informs future teaching and whether or not children need additional support.  When children demonstrate a full understanding, they are then supported to ‘Expert’ level – capable of showing a deeper understanding.  Progress between assessment points and from end of key stages is closely monitored to ensure children are on target.

Statutory assessment schedule

At the end of the Reception year, children are assessed against the early learning goals in 17 different areas.  If a child has met the expected standard in 12 specified areas of learning and development, they are said to have achieved a ‘Good Level of Development’ (GLD).

At the end of Year 1, children take a test called the ‘Phonics Screening Check’ to assess whether or not they have a good understanding of phonics.  Phonics is the system used for introducing children to reading.

At the end of Year 2, children take tests, known as Key Stage One SATs, in reading and maths.  They also have their writing and science skills measured against national standards.  The teachers use the tests to inform a teachers’ judgement of whether or not children are working at, working above or working below the expected standard.

At the end of Year 6, children take tests, known as Key Stage Two SATs, in reading, GPS (grammar, punctuation and spelling) and maths.  They also have their writing and science skills measured against national standards.  The tests are externally marked and the scores used to judge whether children are working at, working above or working below the expected standard.

First published on 3rd May, 2017 and modified 18th October, 2017

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